SIX DISTINCTIVE NOLA ARCHITECTURAL STYLES

CREOLE COTTAGE:
A single story structure set at or near ground level.  Symmetrical four-opening facade wall, usually set on the front property line.  Steeply pitched side-gabled roof.  Stuccoed brick or wood siding exterior.  Creole cottages were typically built as early as 1770 during the Colonial Period and continuing until approximately 1850.  You can find this building style in the French Quarter, Bywater, Marigny, Esplanade Ridge and scattered throughout other New Orleans neighborhoods.

AMERICAN TOWNHOUSE:
A narrow three-story structure set near ground level, with the facade wall on the property line.  Asymmetrical arrangement of facade openings (two windows with front door to left or right).  Balcony commonly found on second floor.  Brick or stuccoed brick exterior.  American Townhouses were urban residences generally built in the American Sector from the 1820’s through 1850’s.  This building style can be found in the Central Business District (CBD) and Lower Garden District, the section of the city originally named the American Sector.

CREOLE TOWNHOUSE:
A two to four story structure set at or near ground level.  Asymmetrical arrangement of arched opening on facade wall set on property line.  Iron balcony on second and sometimes third levels.  Steeply pitched side-gabled roof often with multiple roof dormers.  This type of construct can be found in the French Quarter and Marigny neighborhoods.  The Creole Townhouse was built after the 1788 and 1794 fires that destroyed most of the French Quarter thorugh the mid-1800’s.

RAISED CENTER-HALL COTTAGE:
A one-and-a-half story house raised two to eight feet above ground on brick piers, with full-width front gallery framed by six columns supporting an entablature.  Five openings with front door in the center, and a side-gabled roof, often broken by a single dormer.  Exterior typically wood siding.  This type of construct can be found in Bywater, the Garden District, Uptown, Esplanade Ridge, and Carrollton neighborhoods, as well as scattered sites throughout New Orleans.  The Raised Center-Hall Cottage was developed as a city version of the French Colonial plantation house by Americans settling in New Orleans’ early suburbs after the Louisiana Purchase (1803) through approximately 1870.     

SHOTGUN HOUSE:
Usually one story, but many with a second story set at rear of house (camelback).  Narrow rectangular structure raised on brick piers.  Most have narrow front porch covered by a roof apron and supported by columns and brackets, often with Victorian ornamentation.  Usually end-gabled with roof ridge running front to back.  Varying number of symmetrically arranged facade openings (two to three openings if a “single”, four openings if a “double”.  Wood siding.  This construct can be found in all historic neighborhoods throughout New Orleans, and is the predominat New Orleans house type.  Built from approximately 1850 to 1910.

DOUBLE GALLERY HOUSE:
A two story structure raised on low brick piers.  Side-gabled or hipped roof.  Structure set back from property line.  Covered two story galleries framed by columns supporting entablature.  Asymmetrical arrangement of facade openings (two windows with front door to right or left).  Wood, brick or stuccoed brick exterior.  Found in the Lower Garden District, the Garden District, Uptown and Esplanade Ridge neighborhoods, this contruct was a variation of the urban American Townhouse and built in New Orleans’ early “suburbs”.  The Double Gallery House was typically built from 1820-1850.

Above excerpts quoted from the “Preservation Resource Center (www.prcno.org)” 

 

NEW ORLEANS MAJOR HISTORICAL PERIODS AND THE ASSOCIATED ARCHITECTURAL STYLES:

THE COLONIAL PERIOD (1718-1803)
The French Colonial style

THE POST COLONIAL PERIOD (1803-1830)
The Creole style

THE ANTEBELLUM PERIOD (1830-1862)
The Greek Revival style

THE VICTORIAN PERIOD (1862-1900)
The Gothic Revival Style
The Italianate style
The Second Empire style
The Eastlake style
The Bracket style
The Queen Anne style
The Richardsonian Romanesque style 

THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY (1900-1940)
The Georgian Colonial Revival style
The Neoclassical Revival style
The Tudor Revival style
The Bungalow style
The Spanish Colonial Revival style

THE MODERN PERIOD (1940-present)
The International style

The Suburban Ranch style

Architectural Periods above quoted from “New Orleans Houses by Lloyd Vogt”